Marine Biology, Oceanography, Sociology, Anthropology in Bali, Indonesia

Co-Directed by Michelle Paddack, Ph.D

Program Highlights

  • Snorkel Excursions at Lembongan Island with Nusa Penida tour, Menjangan Island, Jemeluk Beach and in Candidasa (local islands and Blue Lagoon)
  • Snorkel excursion at
  • Activities with NGO’s (Coral Triangle Center, BioRock, Marine Megafauna Foundation, Reef Seen turtle project, Eco Bali)
  • Balinese cooking class
  • Kecak dance and Legong dance performance with gamelan orchestra
  • Wayang kulit shadow puppet performance
  • Balinese dance workshop
  • Stone or wood carving workshop
  • Gamelan orchestra workshop
  • Visit to art museum in Ubud
  • Entry to cultural sites including: Elephant Cave, Gunung Kawi, Tirta Empul, Bali Barat National Park, Jatiluwih rice terraces, Munduk Waterfall, Brahmavihara-Arama Buddhist monastery, Pulaki temple, Pura Ulun Danau Bratan water palace, Traditional salt maker in Kusamba, Tirtagangga water palace, Goa Lawah (Bat Cave), Uluwatu Temple

Program Highlights

  • Students leave Wildlands programs with a broad, global view. Living and studying in another country or region provides an eye opening and life changing perspective on culture. Being a part of a tight knit community and project team is a learning opportunity as well.
  • Students learn skills for collaboration, sharing and giving—each of which is a valuable life skill that transcends career choices and contributes to greater confidence and maturity.
  • Wildlands teams are small in size, typically with just 9–16 students
  • Wildlands programs are designed to take you to the ends of the earth, on a budget. In some cases, your financial aid may apply—check with your school to find out.

Program Highlights

  • The Society for Conservation Biology is pleased to solicit applications for the David H. Smith Conservation Research Fellowship Program.
  • These two year postdoctoral fellowships provide support for outstanding early-career scientists who want to better link conservation science and theory with policy and management, improving and expanding their research skills while directing their efforts towards conservation problems of pressing concern for the United States.
  • Each Fellow proposes a team of at least two mentors: 1. an academic mentor who encourages the Fellow’s continued development as a conservation scientist and 2. a conservation practitioner who connects the Fellow and their research to practical applications.
  • Fellowship awards include an annual salary of $60,500, benefits, and generous travel and research budgets, as well as a lifetime membership to the Society for Conservation Biology.